Friday, April 16, 2021

GOP: falling on their Trump swords

 What is the GOP trying to do?  Commit suicide?  The following recent polls regarding Biden's infrastructure legislation show how out of step with public sentiment is the GOP in Washington.  Biden's own polling is not the issue that is on the front burner.  It is the midterms in 2022 when all members of the House are up for reelection or there will be vacancies to be filled.  One-third of the Senate is also on the ballot.  In gerrymandered districts dominated by the GOP, the Trump loyalists will have no problem becoming their party's candidate, but then they have to deal with the buzz saw in the general election.  Independents and Democrats will be all too eager to remind the GOP party of no just where they stood on the infrastructure bill.   I can see the general election commercials now. "Your GOP candidate opposed...(.fill in the blanks").

The question is will this move any 2020 Trump voters to vote for someone else other than Trump loyalists in 2022 or will "cultural" wars keep them in the Trump fold?  Rolled into the "cultural" issue are some gut grabbing considerations ranging from white nationallism of America firsters, not at all disguised by calling there goal to keep "Anglo-Saxons" in charge of their

  

As Biden approaches 100th day in office, Republicans admit difficulties in attacking his agenda (yahoo.com)

With broad support for his infrastructure plan among U.S. voters, Biden reaches out to GOP (yahoo.com)

Poll: Americans Support Biden's Nontraditional Infrastructure Plan (businessinsider.com)

"Of the following four main findings, three are measures the GOP has argued for excluding from the bill:

  • 87% of the public backed fixing roads and bridges;

  • 82% of the public supported increasing pay for elderly caregivers;

  • 78% of the public supported expanding high-speed broadband;

  • And 70% of the public supported fixing the electrical grid and making buildings and homes more energy efficient.

The poll also found that 50% of respondents supported raising the corporate tax rate from 21% to 28% to pay for the plan. When asked about corporate tax hikes generally, 46% said it was a bad idea because it would raise wages and cost jobs, while 43% said corporate tax hikes should be raised to pay for infrastructure because companies "do not pay their fair share."

https://www.ft.com/content/f15d39d8-7261-4d59-bea5-b318e56775a1    Roger Altman on schism of big busines v GOP voter suppression laws.  Demographics of employees and customers

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